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Recipe: The Ultimate Guide to Preparing Namibian Potjiekos

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Potjiekos, meaning small pot food, is a meat dish cooked in a cast-iron with vegetables. Originally from South Africa, the meal is prepared slowly outdoors over a cast iron pot. The pot is traditionally called “potjie” (pronounced “poi-kee”). 

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While people in South Africa refer to the meal as potjie, Namibia calls it potjiekos (pronounced  ‘poi-key-cos). 

Below is the step-by-step guide.

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How to Make  Potjiekos

Recipe: The Ultimate Guide to Preparing Namibian Potjiekos
Meat for preparing potjiekos. Image source: Freepik licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Ingredients

  • 1 chilli
  • 120 ml milk
  • 1L beef stock
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 sliced onions
  • 1 kg beef & lamb
  • 1 tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp. black pepper
  • 1 tbsp. kapana spice
  • 1 tbsp of ground thyme
  • 2 tbsp of curry powder
  • 300g baby potatoes, peeled
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced (Optional)
  • 3 large carrots, chopped into big chunks

Instructions

  1. Put the stainless steel (if you don’t have a cast iron pot) on fire and add two tablespoons of oil
  2. Brown the meat for a few minutes
  3. Sprinkle the meat with black pepper while frying.
  4. Add some curry powder and turn the meat to fry the opposite side
  5. Remove the meat from the pot after browning and set aside
  6. Saute the onions for 3 minutes
  7. Put the meat back into the pot
  8. Add the beef stock
  9. Add the chili pepper
  10. Add minced garlic
  11. Cover the pot and allow to boil for an hour
  12. Add the carrots and potatoes
  13. Allow to boil for 20 minutes
  14. Mix the sugar, curry powder, and the rest of the spices in the milk
  15. Add to the soup and stir
  16. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes
  17. Serve hot, independently, or with rice or noodles

Tips for Preparing Potjiekos

Recipe: The Ultimate Guide to Preparing Namibian Potjiekos
Cooking potjiekos in a cast iron pot. Image source: Freepik, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
  • If you can, use traditional coal or firewood instead of cooking with gas. Cooking potjiekos on coal or firewood gives the dish a unique flavor.
  • When adding side dishes, keep them simple so that the potjiekos are the star of the meal.
  • After resting in the cooking pot for the night, most potjiekos taste better the next day.
  • It’s best to cook potjiekos very slowly. If the bubbling inside the pot is audible, the food is cooking too quickly. Cook on medium heat if you are using cooking gas, or remove some of the coals that are directly beneath the potjiekos.
  • When dishing up, do it in layers like the potjiekos is prepared.
  • Be careful not to add too much broth, leading to a watery meal because the pot generates its own steam. 

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Video Credit: Lempies

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Namibian Potjiekos

Namibian
Recipe: The Ultimate Guide to Preparing Namibian PotjiekosSedi Djentuh
Potjiekos, meaning small pot food, is a meat dish cooked in a cast-iron with vegetables. Originally from South Africa, the meal is prepared slowly outdoors over a cast iron pot.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 35 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 45 minutes
Course Main Course
Cuisine African
Servings 5
Calories 399 kcal

Equipment

Cast Iron Pot

Ingredients
  

  • 1 chilli
  • 120 ml milk
  • 1 L beef stock
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 sliced onions
  • 1 kg beef & lamb
  • 1 tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp. black pepper
  • 1 tbsp. kapana spice
  • 1 tbsp of ground thyme
  • 2 tbsp of curry powder
  • 300 g baby potatoes peeled
  • 3 cloves of garlic minced (Optional)
  • 3 large carrots chopped into big chunks

Instructions
 

  • Put the stainless steel (if you don’t have a cast iron pot) on fire and add two tablespoons of oil
  • Brown the meat for a few minutes
  • Sprinkle the meat with black pepper while frying.
  • Add some curry powder and turn the meat to fry the opposite side
  • Remove the meat from the pot after browning and set aside
  • Saute the onions for 3 minutes
  • Put the meat back into the pot
  • Add the beef stock
  • Add the chili pepper
  • Add minced garlic
  • Cover the pot and allow to boil for an hour
  • Add the carrots and potatoes
  • Allow to boil for 20 minutes
  • Mix the sugar, curry powder, and the rest of the spices in the milk
  • Add to the soup and stir
  • Cover and simmer for 15 minutes
  • Serve hot, independently, or with rice or noodles

Video

Nutrition

Serving: 1gCalories: 399kcalCarbohydrates: 16.94gProtein: 52gFat: 5.44gSaturated Fat: 1.505gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1.292gMonounsaturated Fat: 2.002gCholesterol: 43mgSodium: 648mgPotassium: 594mgFiber: 3.6g
Keyword potjie, Potjiekos
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Sedi Djentuh
Sedi Djentuh
Hey, Sedi here, a content writer. She's fascinated by the interplay between people, lifestyle, relationships, tech and communication dedicated to empowering and spreading positive messages about humanity. She's an avid reader and a student of personal weekly workouts. When she's not writing, Sedi is busy advocating for plastic-free earth with her local NGO.

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